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More Good Days Start With Orenitram

What is Orenitram?

You may already be taking other oral medicines for your PAH, but Orenitram works differently. Orenitram is an oral prostacyclin medicine that mimics the effects of prostacyclin, a natural substance found in your body that opens up blood vessels so it’s easier for your heart to pump blood through your lungs.

Orenitram has been proven to help delay the progression of PAH and may help improve symptoms. These benefits may help you reach your treatment goals.

Adding Orenitram may help make sure you don’t miss out on the benefits of treating your PAH with a prostacyclin medicine—and that you’re able to capture more good days.

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Orenitram is the tablet form of the same proven and trusted type of medicine that has been available as a pump therapy for more than 18 years.

Help control your PAH with Orenitram

Proven to delay disease progression

In a clinical study, patients who added Orenitram were…

61%

May help patients do more and help control PAH

In clinical studies, adding Orenitram helped patients improve in several ways in as little as 3 months:

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9 out of 10 patients improved or maintained their ability to do more daily activities with fewer symptoms, as measured by functional class*

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Decreased shortness of breath during daily activities*

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Reduced strain on their heart—that means your heart doesn’t have to work as hard to pump blood to your lungs*

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Increased their ability to walk farther, as measured by 6-minute walk distance test

May help improve risk status*

9 out of 10 patients taking ORENITRAM either improved or maintained their PAH risk status.

Patients taking Orenitram either improved or maintained their risk status—and improvement was seen as early as 3 months. In fact, more than 30% of patients improved and were able to maintain improvement through week 60.

Your healthcare provider may use risk status to make decisions about your treatment. It helps them determine how you’re doing today and predict how you will be doing in the future.

To determine your risk status, your healthcare provider may use a calculation that combines many factors, including some measures you may be familiar with, such as:

  • 6-minute walk distance test
  • Functional class
  • Strain on the heart, as measured by NT-proBNP
*In a clinical study that included 690 patients who were all taking a single oral PAH medicine (PDE-5i, sGCS, or ERA). At the beginning of the study, these patients added either Orenitram or placebo to their treatment. In a clinical study that included 349 patients not taking any PAH therapy. At the beginning of the study, these patients began taking either Orenitram or placebo.
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Because Orenitram can help lower your risk status, adding it to your treatment plan may help you capture more good days.

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Guide to understanding Orenitram

Understand how adding Orenitram to your treatment plan may help you do more in your daily life.

See PDFDownload Now
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Talking to your healthcare provider about Orenitram

Use this tool to help you talk to your healthcare provider about whether adding Orenitram is right for you.

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“It’s like I can do more activities without getting shortness of breath or feeling like I’m getting weak.”

—An Orenitram patient
women sitting and talking on a porch
ERA=endothelin receptor antagonist; NT-proBNP=N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide; PAH=pulmonary arterial hypertension; PDE-5i=phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor; sGCS=soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ORENITRAM

Who should not take Orenitram?

Do not take Orenitram if you have severe liver problems.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Orenitram?

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • If you have liver problems or diverticulosis.
  • If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, and/or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed. It is not known if Orenitram will harm your unborn baby or if Orenitram passes into your breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Orenitram.
  • About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Orenitram and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Do not start any new medicine until you check with your healthcare provider. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take another medicine that contains treprostinil, such as Remodulin® or Tyvaso®.

How should I take Orenitram?

  • Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Orenitram is usually taken 3 times a day (about every 8 hours) or 2 times a day (about every 12 hours). Your healthcare provider will tell you how often you should take Orenitram. If you have side effects, your healthcare provider may tell you to change your dose or when you take Orenitram. Take Orenitram with food.
  • Swallow Orenitram tablets whole. Do not split, chew, crush, or break your Orenitram tablets. Do not take Orenitram tablets that are damaged or broken. If Orenitram tablets are not taken whole, they may release too much medicine at one time. This can lead to side effects.
  • If you miss your dose of Orenitram, take the missed dose as soon as possible with food.
  • If you miss 2 or more doses of Orenitram, call your healthcare provider to see if you need to change your dose.
  • If you take too much Orenitram, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.
  • You may see the tablet shell in your stools (bowel movements). This is usually normal. The tablet shell is not digested. If you have diverticulosis, the tablet shell may get stuck in a blind pouch or diverticulum in your intestine.

What are the possible side effects of Orenitram?

Orenitram can cause serious side effects, including worsening of PAH symptoms.

  • Stopping Orenitram suddenly may cause worsening of your PAH symptoms. Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • The most common side effects of Orenitram include headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flushing, and pain in arms, legs, and jaw. These are not all of the possible side effects of Orenitram. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.
  • Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Orenitram?

Orenitram is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Orenitram can help slow down the progression of your disease and improve your ability to exercise. It is not known if Orenitram is safe and effective in children.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more about Orenitram, talk with your healthcare provider.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Patient Information at www.orenitram.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

OREISIconOCT19

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ORENITRAM

Who should not take Orenitram?

Do not take Orenitram if you have severe liver problems.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Orenitram?

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • If you have liver problems or diverticulosis.
  • If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, and/or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed. It is not known if Orenitram will harm your unborn baby or if Orenitram passes into your breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during treatment with Orenitram.
  • About all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Orenitram and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Do not start any new medicine until you check with your healthcare provider. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take another medicine that contains treprostinil, such as Remodulin® or Tyvaso®.

How should I take Orenitram?

  • Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Orenitram is usually taken 3 times a day (about every 8 hours) or 2 times a day (about every 12 hours). Your healthcare provider will tell you how often you should take Orenitram. If you have side effects, your healthcare provider may tell you to change your dose or when you take Orenitram. Take Orenitram with food.
  • Swallow Orenitram tablets whole. Do not split, chew, crush, or break your Orenitram tablets. Do not take Orenitram tablets that are damaged or broken. If Orenitram tablets are not taken whole, they may release too much medicine at one time. This can lead to side effects.
  • If you miss your dose of Orenitram, take the missed dose as soon as possible with food.
  • If you miss 2 or more doses of Orenitram, call your healthcare provider to see if you need to change your dose.
  • If you take too much Orenitram, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.
  • You may see the tablet shell in your stools (bowel movements). This is usually normal. The tablet shell is not digested. If you have diverticulosis, the tablet shell may get stuck in a blind pouch or diverticulum in your intestine.

What are the possible side effects of Orenitram?

Orenitram can cause serious side effects, including worsening of PAH symptoms.

  • Stopping Orenitram suddenly may cause worsening of your PAH symptoms. Do not change your dose or suddenly stop taking Orenitram without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • The most common side effects of Orenitram include headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flushing, and pain in arms, legs, and jaw. These are not all of the possible side effects of Orenitram. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.
  • Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Orenitram?

Orenitram is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Orenitram can help slow down the progression of your disease and improve your ability to exercise. It is not known if Orenitram is safe and effective in children.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more about Orenitram, talk with your healthcare provider.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Patient Information at www.orenitram.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

OREISIconOCT19